Awareness, work and faith are the answer to Congo’s pain

I am Doug Kulungu, from the Democratic Republic of Congo. I am a junior majoring in business at Fresno Pacific University and preparing myself to serve my country. Congo has been at war for about 10 years now and has lost around 5 million of its population. Children are regarded as good targets for rebels […]

What to do with higher ed…now

Those of us who have spent our lives toiling away in the fields of higher education rarely get asked to contribute to the real world. Too much ivory, and too high in the tower for anyone’s good, I suppose. But when invited to the party, it would be impolite to decline. So here I am ready to make an […]

Raise gasoline taxes—really!

Want to make someone hate you really quickly? Tell them you wish gas prices would go back up, and you think we should ask our legislators for a $1.00/gallon consumption tax on gasoline. That should lose you a few friends. Yet this seemingly illogical proposal might make a lot of sense right now, as America […]

In praise of the Fresno public high schools

Many of us think of students from large public inner-city high schools as, well, somewhat deprived. How can they, we reason, get the same level of education, challenge and individual attention as those at, say, smaller and/or private institutions? I will admit to some of these biases, even though I come from a large, public […]

Defending science from science’s defenders

It was fascinating, yet extremely distressing, to come across a large spread in the New York Times the other day placed by an organization apparently called “Defend Science” located in Berkeley, California. Please don’t get me wrong: science does need defending. The rules of science, though sometimes offensive to those with certain agendas, have served […]

Building connections with kids

As we welcome children into the world, we immediately begin to create and build meaningful connections with them. These initial connections are based largely on their total dependence upon us. As we reflect upon their infancy and early childhood, the connections that bring a smile to our face are innumerable. However, as children change and […]

Love and power

People have a love-hate relationship with power. They love to have it, but hate to have it exercised over them. Teaching conflict resolution and leadership skills includes teaching people how to use power and how to work in the presence of power. This is particularly important when working cross-culturally, the norm in California and many […]

Reading is more than just pedaling a bicycle

The teaching of reading never fails to be a hotbed of controversy. For decades, this issue has divided groups of Americans along political and religious lines. I’m perplexed as to why far right-wing religious groups and other conservatives are usually strong advocates for an over-abundance of phonics instruction. According to Frances R.A. Paterson in the […]

Defending whose Judeo-Christian values?

Claims to “Judeo-Christian” values in contemporary U.S. society are ubiquitous. Numerous institutions claim these principles as “foundational.” Various pastors, rabbis, politicians and pundits claim these values reflect America’s foundation as a “Judeo-Christian” nation. However, I fear “Judeo-Christian” values have been co-opted by a cultural understanding that demean them rather than protect them. Should our society […]

Do grades really matter?

For generations, parents have been pushing children to get good grades. When I was a kid, many of my classmates got $10 for an ‘A’ and $5 for a ‘B’ but I received nothing because good grades were simply expected. Today, students continue to receive rewards—candy, cash, ipods, even cars—for good grades from parents and […]