Why Does Dr. Rose Work at FPBS?

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Guest Blog: Dr. David B. Rose

Why Do I Work at FPBS?

That question came to mind two weeks ago when, as part of my sabbatical studies I interviewed two psychology professors in a major university in the Midwest. I was impressed with their commitment to quality education, and even more impressed with the research being done at that university.

But I got the sense that the faculty members I spoke with were a bit impressed with FPBS too. One of the questions I asked those professors was how being located in a Catholic University impacted their program. They responded it didn’t. The financial resources and infrastructure of the university were significant assets for their program. But the program had no interaction with the thousands of years of pastoral theology or experience in “cure of souls” in the Catholic Church. I wonder, if in their search for academic excellence, the program leaders decided it would be simpler to develop a secular program than a religious one.

In our conversation, they asked about our program. I told them we were located in a seminary. That while holding our students to the high academic standards, we intentionally worked to integrate psychology and theology. That integration includes a commitment to facilitating the spiritual and psychological formation of our students. Unlike the Midwestern University’s faculty, who are preparing people to become scientists, we were preparing people for ministry. Our students and alumni take Christ’s love to where it is needed most. Explicitly and implicitly our alumni bring the reign of God into their practice and invite their clients and colleagues to join them there. That is why I work here. I don’t just want to be a professor, writer, or researcher. I want to be a part of preparing our students for ministry.

  • Delores Friesen, Ph.D. LMFT

    Thanks for articulating this so well, Dr. Rose. I heartily agree with your reasons for teaching and working at FPU. I also love the way the students’ questions and interests stimulate and encourage my own growth. Teaching in the Marriage and Family Program at the Seminary has kept my heart, soul and brain engaged and growing for over twenty five years. The diversity and passion of our students creates a rich context for learning and service for faculty, as well as for the students and the Fresno community lends support and incredible opportunities for us all to minister and serve on a daily basis. Delores Friesen, Professor Emerita

  • Sigh…this is wonderful…when I look back on my seminary years, I am grateful for how I was prepared at a soul level for the challenging nuanced work of engaging with clients as they explored their own souls. I will forever be grateful for the depth of my counselling education that was only possible because it happened at a seminary that was in the business of crafting souls for work in the the kingdom!

  • Roger Welsh

    Obadiah was my FPU roommate for the 1971-72 school year….it was truly a privilege to become a friend of Obadiah….such a great human being and brother in Christ….I often wondered how Obadiah was doing back in Nigeria….great to see an article about his life…thanks for sharing it.