Berlin and Wittenberg–Overwhelming!

The last two days for our tour have been overwhelming. As I write this, we are taking a brief break before dinner in our hotel in Halle, a Renaissance city which we will see this evening, the city of the composer Handel. Yesterday we spent in Berlin, a city still rebuilding after the fall of […]

500th Anniverary Reformation Tour 2017–Our Beginning

We have finished day three of the FPU “500th Anniversary Reformation Tour.” There are sixteen of us from Fresno, Clovis, Hanford, Reno, Pensacola, and New Hampshire—a great group to travel with—some experienced, some for the first time traveling. We are enjoying learning, sitting in street side cafes, and exploring the cities. Everyone we have met […]

Jeanne d’Albret and Gracious Leadership

I have been thinking a lot about the Reformation these days. At least I have when I have a few minutes between preparations for new classes. We are heading out on a tour of Reformation Germany, Switzerland and The Netherlands in just about eight weeks. (If you are interested you can find more about it […]

The 500th Anniversary of the Reformation

On October 31, 1517 Martin Luther, Dr. of Theology, planted on the door of the Castle Church in Wittenberg, in Saxony, Germany, 95 theological theses for discussion and debate. It was the standard academic procedure for announcing a debate. Soon, very soon, his words (not couched in formal academic prose and occasionally satirical and acerbic) […]

Sabbatical

After many years, I am on my first full-fledged sabbatical. The last 19 years of administration made it difficult to take an extended period of time for study, reflection, and writing or creation of some kind. That, by the way, is a definition of a sabbatical. It is not just time off, but time for […]

Books that Shape Us

Earlier this semester, Hope Nisly, one of our librarians, ask me to contribute to the library’s series on books that have shaped our lives.  Here is my piece.  Thank you to Hope and the Library staff for finding ways to reach students in personal ways.   The Confessions, St. Augustine It might seem like I am […]

Practicing Scholarship

Somewhere in my office I have a cartoon from the New Yorker, I believe, that shows two people standing next to a headstone. Below the deceased’s name and dates are the words “Published but Perished Anyway.” It points to what is widely thought to be the reason for scholarly publication—to survive in the academic world. […]

On Reading and Misreading, Faith and Reason

A few months ago I picked up the French Philosopher Luc Ferry’s recent A Brief History of Thought: a philosophical guide to living. Ferry is a professor of philosophy at the Sorbonne in Paris, and was for a couple of years the French Minister of National Education. He is an important figure in French intellectual […]

The Changing Nature of the Professorate

The title of this brief piece is one of those now conventional titles by which a series of developments and questions in higher education is discussed and agonized over. It is not a topic that is neutral; the title attempts to blunt the emotion that often goes with it. A little background—historically (I always like […]

Shared Governance: Start Here

In this post, I will outline what I think is commonly understood about shared governance in universities, and I will use some examples along the way of how Fresno Pacific practices it. I will also explain how I routinely practice it.  This is difficult given the various ways in which the phrase is used and […]