Practical solutions to poverty from unexpected sources

By Randy White, D.Min, I’ve had an article taped to my desk for almost a year. Mark Arax’s “Delusions of the Valley: The Poverty we Pretend Not to See” has unsettled me over and over, powerfully, uncomfortably unmasking the realities we are so tired of acknowledging—the stubbornness of our poverty and crime, the lack of […]

Learning from Lincoln

February 12, 2009, will mark 200 years since the birth the man scholars and the American public generally agree is our greatest president. Abraham Lincoln, born into frontier poverty in 1809, progressed through an amazing series of struggles and achievements to become the 16th president of the United States at a time when the very […]

Awareness, work and faith are the answer to Congo’s pain

I am Doug Kulungu, from the Democratic Republic of Congo. I am a junior majoring in business at Fresno Pacific University and preparing myself to serve my country. Congo has been at war for about 10 years now and has lost around 5 million of its population. Children are regarded as good targets for rebels […]

In praise of the Fresno public high schools

Many of us think of students from large public inner-city high schools as, well, somewhat deprived. How can they, we reason, get the same level of education, challenge and individual attention as those at, say, smaller and/or private institutions? I will admit to some of these biases, even though I come from a large, public […]

Defending science from science’s defenders

It was fascinating, yet extremely distressing, to come across a large spread in the New York Times the other day placed by an organization apparently called “Defend Science” located in Berkeley, California. Please don’t get me wrong: science does need defending. The rules of science, though sometimes offensive to those with certain agendas, have served […]

Building connections with kids

As we welcome children into the world, we immediately begin to create and build meaningful connections with them. These initial connections are based largely on their total dependence upon us. As we reflect upon their infancy and early childhood, the connections that bring a smile to our face are innumerable. However, as children change and […]

Reading is more than just pedaling a bicycle

The teaching of reading never fails to be a hotbed of controversy. For decades, this issue has divided groups of Americans along political and religious lines. I’m perplexed as to why far right-wing religious groups and other conservatives are usually strong advocates for an over-abundance of phonics instruction. According to Frances R.A. Paterson in the […]

Do grades really matter?

For generations, parents have been pushing children to get good grades. When I was a kid, many of my classmates got $10 for an ‘A’ and $5 for a ‘B’ but I received nothing because good grades were simply expected. Today, students continue to receive rewards—candy, cash, ipods, even cars—for good grades from parents and […]

Enough room at the table

There has been a lot of discussion about the emergent church lately and most Christian denominations in North America have been involved in the conversation. Many churches have started alternate worship services, some pastors and parishioners attend emergent cohorts and many churches have begun to incorporate historic Christian practices such as prayer labyrinths, creeds and […]

Job sharing another way to look at work

The typical female over-achiever: do well in high school and college, get a great job, fall in love, get married and have a baby. Now what? The dilemma of most new professional mothers: work or stay-at-home. An increasingly popular option is part-time employment. This doesn’t mean leaving an executive or administrative job for an entry […]